Friday, November 25, 2022

Can You Donate Blood If You Have Genital Herpes

Donating Blood With Herpes: What To Consider

It Might Be Good to Have Herpes | Trained Immunity

Can you donate blood if you have herpes? Usually, there is no restriction on donating blood for people with herpes. But, you should avoid donating blood during the primary outbreak of the disease . This is because a small quantity of virus can reach the blood during the initial manifestation of symptoms. Furthermore, blood donation is usually not advised during any illness the flu, a primary or repeated herpes outbreak, or otherwise. While you are ill, your body is busy fighting off an infection hence, donating blood during this time may further strain your body.

Its perfectly fine to donate blood during a recurrent herpes outbreak if you are otherwise feeling healthy. According to the guidelines by the American Red Cross about blood donation with herpes, people with oral or genital herpes may donate blood if they otherwise feel healthy and fulfill other eligibility criteria.

Restrictions For Donating Blood If You Have An Std

There are varying timelines for when you can or cannot donate blood with STDs. When in doubt, reach out to your local blood bank and ask for their specific guidelines. You should not donate blood if you suspect you may have human immunodeficiency virus , acquired immunodeficiency syndrome , human T-lymphotropic virus , or hepatitis.

You can never donate blood if you:

  • Are HIV positive or receiving HIV treatment
  • Are HTLV positiveâ
  • Are a carrier of Hepatitis B or C

The American Red Cross says you should not donate if you have done any of the following in the past three months:

  • Were a sex worker
  • Are a man and had sex with another man
  • Had sexual contact with anyone who meets the above-listed criteria
  • Injected recreational drugs
  • Had a sex partner who is HIV or HTLV positive, a carrier of hepatitis B or C, or a partner who has injected drugs not prescribed by a doctorâ
  • Took Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis or Truvada for preventing HIV

If you contracted syphilis or gonorrhea, wait three months following completion of your treatment to donate blood. If you have chlamydia, HPV, or genital herpes, you can still donate blood if you meet the other eligibility requirements.

Complete Care And Our Patients Thank You For Donating Blood

Complete Care and our patients thank you for donating blood! Like all emergency rooms, Complete Care relies on donated blood to help save the lives of our patients. Just one donation can help save up to three lives! Blood cells, platelets, plasma its all useful and potentially life-saving. Find a local blood drive near you and schedule a date to donate today. And thank you, from the bottom of our hearts!

If you find yourself feeling especially ill after a blood donation, Complete Care is here to help. We are open 24/7 and welcome walk-ins. We are here for any of your health concerns. Visit your nearest Complete Care location today for quick, efficient, patient-centered care today.

More Helpful Articles by Complete Care:

Read Also: How To Find Out If You Have Herpes At Home

Can You Donate Blood With Herpes

Though yeast infections are not an STD, many think they might be the result of an STD. They are similar to the discharge and painful swelling from chlamydia and gonorrhea. But there are some differences. It is hard to tell the difference to the naked eye, so getting tested is the ultimate fail safe. Our tests will be able to let you know exactly what is going on and whether it is a yeast infection or something else.

You can be excluded from donating blood if you have had a serious STD in the past 12 months.

Abdominal Discomfort And Intestinal Diseases

Can You Donate Blood if You Have Herpes?

Lactose intolerance, functional abdominal discomfort, heartburn, constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, haemorrhoids and coeliac disease do not prevent blood donation.

However, you may not donate blood if you suffer from an inflammatory intestinal disease such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. In these cases, blood may be donated a year after the end of related symptoms and drug therapy.

Gastroenteritis temporarily prevents donation. At least two weeks must have passed since you stopped having symptoms and taking medication before donating blood.

In the case of parasitic intestinal diseases , at least a month must have passed since you stopped having symptoms and taking medication before donating blood. If you are an asymptomatic carrier of the disease, this does not prevent blood donation.

An infection caused by the Campylobacter prevents donation for a month after the symptoms and treatment have ended.

The majority of stomach medications are also allowed for blood donors. Heartburn medicines, antacids and prophylactic medication used for gastric ulcers do not prevent blood donation. Instead, medication used for the treatment of inflammatory intestinal diseases prevent donation.

See also: H. pylori infection, surgeries and endoscopic procedures

Would you like more information? Please call the free information number for blood donors on +358 800 0 5801 .

Recommended Reading: When To Test For Herpes

Genital Herpes Is Common Shouldnt Cdc Recommend Testing For Everyone

CDC recommends herpes testing for people who have genital symptoms to confirm if they have it. Testing allows a healthcare provider to talk with patients about what to expect in the future. This includes talking about medications that help with symptoms. Providers can also tell patients how to lower the risk of transmitting herpes to sex partner.

CDC does not recommend herpes testing for people without symptoms in most situations. This is because of the limits of a herpes blood test and the possibility of a wrong test result. The chances of wrong test results are higher for people who are at low risk of infection.

Blood tests might be useful if:

  • You have genital symptoms that could be related to herpes, or
  • You have a sex partner with genital herpes, or
  • Your provider found signs of herpes, but you still need a test to confirm it.

If you are sexually active, talk openly and honestly with your healthcare provider about what tests are right for you. These tips can help.

How Is Genital Herpes Spread

  • Saliva from a partner with an oral herpes infection
  • Genital fluids from a partner with a genital herpes infection
  • Skin in the oral area of a partner with oral herpes or
  • Skin in the genital area of a partner with genital herpes.

You also can get genital herpes from a sex partner who does not have a visible sore or is unaware of their infection. It is also possible to get genital herpes if you receive oral sex from a partner with oral herpes.

You will not get herpes from toilet seats, bedding, or swimming pools. You also will not get it from touching objects, such as silverware, soap, or towels.

If you have more questions about herpes, consider discussing your concerns with a healthcare provider.

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You Have Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hiv/aids Or May Have Been Exposed To These Diseases Via Sexual Contact

Hepatitis B and C and HIV/AIDs are diseases that can be passed on via blood transfusion, and therefore individuals who suffer from these diseases are ineligible to donate blood. Unfortunately, these aforementioned diseases can be transmitted through sexual contact, so if you are not certain whether or not you may have contracted these diseases from previous sexual partners, consider deferring your donation until you are sure. All donated blood is screened for hepatitis B and C and HIV.

Sexually transmitted diseases and blood donation:

When it comes to blood donation, other STDs are often wrongly lumped into the same category as hepatitis B and C and HIV. In reality, the ARC has separate recommendations for STDs and venereal diseases.

  • Gonorrhea and syphilis: You should still defer blood donation if you are not certain whether or not you may have contracted gonorrhea and syphilis. However, if you have contracted gonorrhea or syphilis, you will still donate blood so long as you complete your treatment of the disease and wait 3 full months after the treatment is completed.
  • Chlamydia, HPV, and genital herpes: Individuals who suffer from chlamydia, HPV, or genital herpes are eligible to donate blood.

Why Genital Herpes Comes Back

Sexual Health – Herpes

Genital herpes is caused by a virus called herpes simplex. Once you have the virus, it stays in your body.

It will not spread in your body to cause blisters elsewhere. It stays in a nearby nerve and causes blisters in the same area.

If you can, avoid things that trigger your symptoms.

Triggers can include:

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Infected With Herpes Can I Donate Blood

Dear Alice,

Is it safe for someone with herpes to donate blood? I know someone with HIV or hepatitis should not, but what I’ve read suggests that herpes doesn’t hang out in the blood. I used to be a regular donor, but since I contracted herpes some years ago, I’ve stopped. Would it be safe for me to start again?

If you have genital herpes can you still give blood?

Dear readers,

Your thoughtfullness is much appreciated by the recipients of your blood donations! While you are correct that persons infected with HIV or hepatitis are not able to give blood, people who have herpes are generally not restricted from donating. However, during a primary outbreak of herpes , a person infected with herpes should not donate blood. The very first time the symptoms of herpes manifest, it’s possible for a small amount of the virus to enter the bloodstream. Also, it is generally not advisable to donate blood when you’re not feeling well, be it due to a primary or recurrent outbreak of herpes, the flu, or another illness. When you’re sick, your body is already trying to fight off an infection, and giving blood at such a time can put a little extra strain on your body.

A number of other health conditions may impact your ability to donate blood. You can check out the American Red Cross eligibility guidelines to find out more or to look up your specific medical issues and whether you can be a donor.

May 15, 2015Originally published

Blood Donation Eligibility Basic Requirements

Before we get too deep into giving blood restrictions, lets cover a few requirements that dont have anything to do with your health. In order to donate blood, you must:

  • Be at least 17 years old. In some states, you can give blood at 16 years-of-age with parental consent.
  • Weight at least 110 lbs. The weight limit is enforced because the amount of blood in your body is roughly proportional to your weight the bodies of individuals who weigh less than 110 lbs. may not respond well to the standard amount of blood drawn during donations.

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Allergy And Anaphylactic Shock

In most cases, allergy does not prevent donation. Ordinary allergies which are controlled using antihistamine tablets, nasal sprays or eye drops are not an obstacle to donating blood. In addition, common allergy medications do not prevent donation.

However, a serious allergic reaction or anaphylaxis will result in a blood donation deferral period of two weeks starting after the end of treatment.

Desensitisation implemented with injections causes a three-day waiting period after each injection. If the therapy is performed with tablets, it causes a two-week long obstacle to donation starting from the day the therapy begins.

Would you like more information? Please call the free information number for blood donors on +358 800 0 5801 .

Intravenous Drugs And Use Of Pharmaceutical Products Without A Doctors Prescription

Can You Give Blood If You Have Herpes

The use of intravenous drugs, even just once, means you may not donate blood.

The use of intravenous pharmaceutical products without a doctors prescription, even just once, prevents you from donating blood.

If your sex partner has used intravenous drugs or other intravenous pharmaceutical products without doctors prescription, please call our information number in order to check your eligibility to donate blood.

Drug use prevents blood donation. An isolated case of trying drugs or casual use of drugs other than intravenous drugs causes a temporary, two week long obstacle to blood donation.

Would you like more information? Please call the free information number for blood donors on +358 800 0 5801 .

Recommended Reading: How To Stop Genital Herpes From Spreading

You Traveled To The Wrong Place At The Wrong Time

Travel exposes us to different cultures, customs, and diseases. Unfortunately, some of these diseases can affect your ability to donate blood.

Mad Cow Disease / Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease is an infectious brain disease that occurs in humans and can be passed on via blood transfusion. Individuals with CJD are not allowed to donate blood. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, more commonly known as Mad Cow Disease, is a variant of CJD that can be passed on to humans when they eat food products from cows sick with Bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Once infected, humans can then pass vCJD on to other humans via blood transfusions.

In the 80s and 90s, the UK saw a widespread outbreak of Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cows. Symptoms from vCJD can take years to show. Currently, there is no sufficient test that can be used to screen all blood donors for vCJD before donation, which is why certain restrictions are placed on potential donors who traveled to, lived in, received blood transfusions in and around the UK during those times.

In particular, you will not be allowed to donate blood due concerns over vCJD if you:

  • Traveled/lived 3 months or more in the UK from Jan. 1st, 1980 Dec. 31st, 1996
  • Traveled/lived 5 years or more in France or Ireland from Jan. 1st 1990 Dec. 31st,1996
  • Received a blood transfusion in France, Ireland, or the UK from Jan. 1st, 1980 present

Malaria

Appropriate wait times for blood donation if exposed to malaria:

Can I Still Have Sex If I Have Herpes

If you have herpes, you should talk to your sex partner about their risk. Using condoms may help lower this risk but it will not get rid of the risk completely. Having sores or other symptoms of herpes can increase your risk of spreading the disease. Even if you do not have any symptoms, you can still infect your sex partners.

You may have concerns about how genital herpes will impact your health, sex life, and relationships. While herpes is not curable, it is important to know that it is manageable with medicine. Daily suppressive therapy can lower your risk of spreading the virus to others. Talk to a healthcare provider about your concerns and treatment options.

A genital herpes diagnosis may affect how you will feel about current or future sexual relationships. Knowing how to talk to sexual partners about STDs is important.

Read Also: What Is The Medicine For Herpes Zoster

Herpes Myths Vs Facts

Herpes Myth: Only certain sorts of people get herpes.

Fact about herpes: No, it is very common and anyone who has ever had sex can get genital herpes. Its not about being clean, dirty, good or bad its about being normal and sexually active.

Herpes Myth: Herpes isnt that common, and I am unlikely to get it.

Fact about herpes: Herpes is very common and may be caused by both herpes simplex type 1 and herpes simplex type 2 . HSV-1 causes cold sores on the mouth, and up to 80% of the population has this virus. However, it may also be transmitted to the genitals through oral-genital sex and about 40% of genital herpes is caused by HSV-1. Up to 22% of sexually active adults have genital herpes caused by HSV-2. Most people with herpes will not have symptoms and therefore will not be aware they have it. 75% of people who have genital herpes get it from partners who are entirely unaware that they have it themselves.

Herpes Myth: Herpes cold sores on the mouth are not the same as genital herpes.

Fact about herpes: Cold sores on the mouth or face are caused by HSV-1 and are commonly transmitted to the genitals through oral-to-genital sex. Up to 40% of genital herpes is caused by HSV-1.

Herpes Myth: Herpes can only affect the genital area.

Herpes Myth: People always know if they have genital herpes.

Fact about herpes: No, 80% of those with genital herpes do not know they have it, as they may have no or very mild symptoms.

Herpes Myth: People with herpes are always infectious.

How Do I Know If I Have Genital Herpes

Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of herpes | Infectious diseases | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy

Most people with genital herpes have no symptoms or have very mild symptoms. Mild symptoms may go unnoticed or be mistaken for other skin conditions like a pimple or ingrown hair. Because of this, most people do not know they have a herpes infection.

Herpes sores usually appear as one or more blisters on or around the genitals, rectum or mouth. This is known as having an outbreak. The blisters break and leave painful sores that may take a week or more to heal. Flu-like symptoms also may occur during the first outbreak.

People who experience an initial outbreak of herpes can have repeated outbreaks, especially if they have HSV-2. However, repeat outbreaks are usually shorter and less severe than the first outbreak. Although genital herpes is a lifelong infection, the number of outbreaks may decrease over time.

Ask a healthcare provider to examine you if:

  • You notice any symptoms or
  • Your partner has an STD or symptoms of an STD.

STD symptoms can include an unusual sore, a smelly genital discharge, burning when peeing, or bleeding between periods .

Read Also: How To Read Herpes Blood Test Results

Can You Donate Blood If You Have Herpes

by BenPublished on February 1, 2019Updated on June 15, 2020

Can you donate blood if you have herpes or another STD? With January being national blood donor month, this question is undoubtedly on the minds of many. Whether you have herpes or another STD, or you are STD free, you might be curious about restrictions for donating blood as they relate to a donors STD status.

When donating blood, most donation centers prefer that you be as healthy as possible, and that includes being free of many viral infections ranging from the common cold to HIV. But what about other common infections, such as herpes?

The important distinction between herpes and certain other STDs, especially when compared to a virus like HIV, is that herpes is not a virus that is present in the blood. Because herpes is only communicated through direct skin-to-skin contact, the blood of a patient infected with the herpes virus cannot pass herpes to another person through a blood transfusion. However, there are still some important restrictions and stipulations for people who have herpes symptoms when it comes to donating blood.

But what about other STDs? Typically, in addition to herpes, you can donate blood if you have chlamydia or HPV, are feeling healthy and meet all other eligibility requirements.

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