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Can You Give Blood If You Have Herpes

Can You Donate Plasma If You Have Herpes

Diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of herpes | Infectious diseases | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy

Herpes is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the herpes simplex virus. It can affect any part of your body, but it is most commonly found on the genitals and mouth. Can you donate plasma if you have herpes? Well, if you have herpes and are looking for ways to make money through plasma donation, DoNotPay can help.

DoNotPay is an AI-powered chatbot that helps users fight a variety of everyday legal disputes. If you have herpes and want to make some extra cash, you don’t have to worry DoNotPay can help you donate plasma. The chatbot will easily help you find donation centers near you that accept those with herpes. This allows you to make some extra money while helping others in an easy and fast process.

The Bottom Line: Tests For Herpes Are More Worry Than They’re Worth

If you do have symptoms, don’t fret: If you know your status, you’re at an advantage in that you can talk with your doctor and find an antiviral drug that works for you. Medication can curtail the severity of your symptoms, as well as the number of outbreaks you get. Additionally, taking an antiviral daily will greatly reduce your chances of transmitting the virus to someone else. In case you missed it, there’s also a very promising new drug for herpes on the horizon, which researchers say could be the most effective one yet.

When Cant You Donate Blood

The American Red Crosswarns against donating blood if you have done any of the following in the past three months:

  • Worked as a sex worker
  • Taken Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis or Truvada for preventing HIV
  • Had sex with someone who has HIV, HTLV, or Hepatitis B or C
  • Injected recreational drugs or had sex with someone who injected drugs not prescribed by a doctor

People who do the above are at a higher risk of contracting an STD or other diseases that make blood unsuitable for transfusions. You also shouldnt donate blood if you weigh less than 110 pounds. If you give blood while weighing less than 110 pounds, your weight may drop too quickly and trigger health complications.

People who have the following conditions should also not give blood:

  • Hemochromatosis a hereditary disorder that causes iron salts to accumulate in the tissues, leading to liver damage, diabetes mellitus, and other issues
  • Leukemia, lymphoma, or Hodgkins disease in the past
  • A dura mater transplant
  • A Zika infection in the last four months
  • Ebola at any time in your life
  • Hepatitis B or C or jaundice without an identified cause
  • A trip to a place where malaria is widespread
  • A blood transfusion within the last year

If you have active tuberculosis or any other sickness, you shouldnt donate blood. Thats because donating blood weakens you, which can complicate your recovery. Only donate blood after fully recovering from any sickness you might have.

People on the following medications also cannot donate blood:

Also Check: How To Speed Up Herpes Outbreak Healing

Infected With Herpes Can I Donate Blood

Dear Alice,

Is it safe for someone with herpes to donate blood? I know someone with HIV or hepatitis should not, but what I’ve read suggests that herpes doesn’t hang out in the blood. I used to be a regular donor, but since I contracted herpes some years ago, I’ve stopped. Would it be safe for me to start again?

If you have genital herpes can you still give blood?

Dear readers,

Your thoughtfullness is much appreciated by the recipients of your blood donations! While you are correct that persons infected with HIV or hepatitis are not able to give blood, people who have herpes are generally not restricted from donating. However, during a primary outbreak of herpes , a person infected with herpes should not donate blood. The very first time the symptoms of herpes manifest, it’s possible for a small amount of the virus to enter the bloodstream. Also, it is generally not advisable to donate blood when you’re not feeling well, be it due to a primary or recurrent outbreak of herpes, the flu, or another illness. When you’re sick, your body is already trying to fight off an infection, and giving blood at such a time can put a little extra strain on your body.

A number of other health conditions may impact your ability to donate blood. You can check out the American Red Cross eligibility guidelines to find out more or to look up your specific medical issues and whether you can be a donor.

May 15, 2015Originally published

Restrictions For Donating Blood If You Have An Std

Can You Donate Blood If You Have Herpes or HPV?

There are varying timelines for when you can or cannot donate blood with STDs. When in doubt, reach out to your local blood bank and ask for their specific guidelines. You should not donate blood if you suspect you may have human immunodeficiency virus , acquired immunodeficiency syndrome , human T-lymphotropic virus , or hepatitis.

You can never donate blood if you:

  • Are HIV positive or receiving HIV treatment
  • Are HTLV positiveâ
  • Are a carrier of Hepatitis B or C

The American Red Cross says you should not donate if you have done any of the following in the past three months:

  • Were a sex worker
  • Are a man and had sex with another man
  • Had sexual contact with anyone who meets the above-listed criteria
  • Injected recreational drugs
  • Had a sex partner who is HIV or HTLV positive, a carrier of hepatitis B or C, or a partner who has injected drugs not prescribed by a doctorâ
  • Took Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis or Truvada for preventing HIV

If you contracted syphilis or gonorrhea, wait three months following completion of your treatment to donate blood. If you have chlamydia, HPV, or genital herpes, you can still donate blood if you meet the other eligibility requirements.

Read Also: How Do You Contract Genital Herpes

Can You Donate Blood If You Have Herpes

by BenPublished on February 1, 2019Updated on June 15, 2020

Can you donate blood if you have herpes or another STD? With January being national blood donor month, this question is undoubtedly on the minds of many. Whether you have herpes or another STD, or you are STD free, you might be curious about restrictions for donating blood as they relate to a donors STD status.

When donating blood, most donation centers prefer that you be as healthy as possible, and that includes being free of many viral infections ranging from the common cold to HIV. But what about other common infections, such as herpes?

The important distinction between herpes and certain other STDs, especially when compared to a virus like HIV, is that herpes is not a virus that is present in the blood. Because herpes is only communicated through direct skin-to-skin contact, the blood of a patient infected with the herpes virus cannot pass herpes to another person through a blood transfusion. However, there are still some important restrictions and stipulations for people who have herpes symptoms when it comes to donating blood.

But what about other STDs? Typically, in addition to herpes, you can donate blood if you have chlamydia or HPV, are feeling healthy and meet all other eligibility requirements.

Testing Options For Hsv

Your doctor can order one of two kinds of HSV tests:

  • A test of some material taken from a lesion and then grown in a culture
  • The DNA test is generally more accurate. It picks up more infections than a culture, says Handsfield.

    DNA tests have become the more common HSV test in the United States, he adds, and suggests that you ask your doctor to order one if youre being tested for herpes.

    If a test is done, also ask your doctor to request a determination of the virus type, he says, to see if you have HSV-1 or HSV-2.

    The natural course of the disease and the need for treatment for HSV-1 and HSV-2 are different, Handsfield says. With HSV-1, recurrent outbreaks are much less likely, and if they do occur are likely to be much more widely spaced.

    Forty percent of people with HSV-1 have no recurrent outbreaks in the year or two after infection, and often none after that, says Handsfield.

    In contrast, an infection with HSV-2 that produces symptoms often leads to outbreaks about four to five times each year. Also a person with HSV-2 is more contagious during symptom-free periods. So transmission via sex is far more likely with HSV-2 than with HSV-1, he says.

    If you have HSV-2, you are more likely to benefit from ongoing antiviral therapy, says Handsfield, considering how frequent outbreaks can be with that form of the virus.

    Remember, though, while a herpes blood test can help determine if you have herpes infection, the test cannot tell you who gave you the infection.

    Recommended Reading: Can You Be Born With Herpes

    Sydney Sweeney Chopped Her Hair Into A Lob And Said Goodbye To The Middle Part

    All of this tells us that sure, there are some currently available blood tests for herpes that can tell you your status or give you some idea of it but they’re still far from perfect. And when we’re dealing with a illness that’s highly and widely stigmatized the way herpes has become, most people are looking for airtight answers. This is precisely why so many doctors, as well as the CDC, do not recommend getting tested unless you have the common symptoms associated with herpes, such as itching, burning, or a blister.

    If You Have Concerns After You Have Donated

    Who Should BeTested for Herpes?

    If after giving blood, if you become aware of or remember any information about your health that could affect whether we should transfuse your blood, please call the Blood Donor Room at or email .

    As of June 1, 2000, Public Health Law requires that a confirmed positive HIV test be confidentially reported to the New York State Department of Health.

    Also Check: What Kills Herpes On Surfaces

    If You Have Zero Symptoms Getting Tested Won’t Help You

    The problem is that blood tests for herpes when no lesions or symptoms are present are often bullshit. I realize that’s a pretty strong word, but after speaking with doctors who have administered these tests, it’s become more and more apparent to me how misunderstood and in some cases, just plain wrong the results they give are.

    Part of the reason they’re flawed has to do with the fact that most people have been exposed to HSV-1 or oral herpes. “For HSV-1, close to 100 percent of people in the U.S. are antibody-positive because they have been exposed at some point in their lives, though only a percentage of these individuals will actually get cold sores,” says Adam Friedman, the residency program director at the George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences in Washington, D.C. He adds that blood tests can be misleading because they usually don’t detect the herpes virus itself and instead look at the level of antibodies against the virus, which is merely a sign of immune response to it.

    How Test Accuracy Is Measure

    The accuracy of all medical tests, including herpes tests, is measured based on two values: sensitivity and specificity.

    Sensitivityis how often a test correctly identifies someone with a disease. A test that is 90% sensitive will correctly identify 90 people out of 100 who have the disease. Ten people will have a false-negative result.

    Specificity, on the other hand, refers to a test’s ability to correctly identify someone who doesn’t have the disease. If a test is 90% specific, that means that 90 people out of 100 will be correctly diagnosed as not having a disease and that 10 people will have a false-positive result.

    The higher the sensitivity and specificity, the lower the chances of a false result.

    Recommended Reading: How Can I Get Checked For Herpes

    What Is Donated Blood Used For

    Not only is blood given to people who have a lost a lot of their own blood due to an injury, but the red cells, plasma, and platelets which make up blood are used in cancer, blood disease, and anaemia treatments, as well as during transplant surgeries and in the treatment of burns. This list is not exhaustive. Donated blood has many useful medical purposes.

    Is It Possible To Have Herpes And Not Know It

    Can You Donate Blood if You Have Herpes?

    By | Oct. 5, 2010, 11:48 a.m.

    Category:

    Is it possible to have herpes and not know it because you have never had any sores?

    Yes. Millions of people have genital herpes and dont even know it, because they never had symptoms or their symptoms were minor. Because the sores of an outbreak go away and do not always recur, and because they can be mistaken for minor problems like razor burn, many people never see a health care provider to get a proper diagnosis.

    When someone does have symptoms, they can include

    • pain and discomfort in the genital area
    • itching and burning sensations during urination

    Sores can last up to several weeks and then go away. Sores can return up to six times a year or more, or they may not return for years, if ever.

    If you think youve been exposed to herpes or have symptoms that sound like those described above, see your health care provider. She or he can take swabs of the sores or perform a blood test to see if you have herpes. Although there is no cure for herpes, there are prescription drugs available to treat the symptoms and to reduce the number of recurrences.

    Tags:herpes, STDs

    Planned Parenthood delivers vital reproductive health care, sex education, and information to millions of people worldwide. Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc. is a registered 501 nonprofit under EIN 13-1644147. Donations are tax-deductible to the fullest extent allowable under the law.

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    What Happens If I Dont Receive Treatment

    Genital herpes can cause painful genital sores and can be severe in people with suppressed immune systems.

    If you touch your sores or fluids from the sores, you may transfer herpes to another body part like your eyes. Do not touch the sores or fluids to avoid spreading herpes to another part of your body. If you do touch the sores or fluids, quickly wash your hands thoroughly to help avoid spreading the infection.

    If you are pregnant, there can be problems for you and your unborn fetus, or newborn baby. See Im pregnant. How could genital herpes affect my baby? for information about this.

    If You Have Genital Herpes Can You Donate Blood

    Before discussing whether you can donate blood when you have herpes, we need to answer the question: Can herpes be transmitted through blood donation?

    Previously, blood collection facilities allowed herpes carriers to donate blood as long as they did not have an active infection. Thats because many believed that herpes could spread only during intercourse or via direct skin-to-skin contact.

    However,recent studies suggest that herpes may spread via blood transfusions, regardless of whether the infected has an active infection. Since there isnt enough evidence to support this theory, many facilities still accept blood from herpes carriers.

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    How Common Is Infection With Hsv

    Infection with either HSV-1 or HSV-2 is remarkably common. In fact, the majority of people in the world are infected with one of the two herpes viruses.

    According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , more than 1 in 6 people living in the United States has genital herpes.

    However, U.S. rates of infection with HSV-1 and HSV-2 declined between 1999 and 2016, according to the CDC. In 2016, among people between ages 14 and 49, the prevalence of HSV-2 was 12 percent, compared with 18 percent in 1999. This means that about 1 in 8 people in this age range had HSV-2.

    HSV-1 prevalence also declined during those years, from 59 percent in 1999 to 48 percent in 2016.

    Taking a global look at the numbers, in 2016, 67 percent of the people in the world who were younger than 50 had an infection caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 , says the World Health Organization . That adds up to more than 3.7 billion people.

    Accuracy By Test Type

    Introduction to Human Herpesviruses (HHV)

    Two blood tests are used to screen for herpes. To ensure that an initial positive result is correct, a second test using a different method of detection is used to confirm the results.

    The first test is the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay . An ELISA looks for immune proteins, called antibodies, that are produced by the immune system in response to the HSV. HSV antibodies are present even when there are no symptoms.

    If the ELISA result is positive, your healthcare provider may administer a Western blot assay. This second test looks for proteins on the surface of the virus, called antigens, which serve as the virus’ “ID tag.” HSV antibodies produced in response to these antigens help the immune system target its attack.

    According to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, the accuracy of the two blood used to diagnose herpes breaks down as follows:

    Test
    Over 99% Over 99%

    Due to its high level of sensitivity and specificity, the Western blot is considered the gold standard of herpes blood testing.

    With that said, the accuracy of the tests can be affected by the timing of the tests. For an ELISA to return an accurate result, the immune system needs to produce enough antibodies to reach detectable levels.

    Testing too early during the so-called window period can end up causing a false-negative result .

    Recommended Reading: What Does Herpes Do To Your Immune System

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